HONDA EXPRESS SR (NX50) - OWNER REVIEWS



SUBMIT REVIEW

honda-express-sr-1982
1981 HONDA EXPRESS SR
Milage: 1000 - 5000 Miles
Likes: Low CG makes for easy handling, cylinder and CVT can be tuned
Dislikes: Parts are hard to come by

Review:
”I picked up my '81 Express SR from a co-worker. It had been sitting outside for many years and hadn't been ridden for over 15 years. I did re-do the top end with a "B" piston since the bore needed a little work. Bike ran well and would hit 34mph with a 250 lbs rider and 3.00 x 10 tires.

Drive belts are hard to come by and very few parts are left for the engine and chassis. Best bet for tuning parts is Treatland; there are cylinder kits that can be fitted for better power.”



1982 HONDA EXPRESS SR
Milage: 1000 - 5000 Miles
Likes: Fun, Fuel Economy
Dislikes: Insufficient Power

Review:
”I owned a Honda Express SR while stationed in Pearl Harbor, HI during the early 1980s. I'll try to write a review based on my memory of this machine.

For life on Oahu, one didn't need much more than a little scooter. Even the Honda Express SR, its 50cc engine notwithstanding, put much of the island within an hour's riding time. The top speed was 32-33 mph WFO.

The fuel economy was great. I literally ran that thing on pocket change! Since I was in Hawaii, everything had to be brought in, which made everything, including fuel, more expensive; even in the early 1980s, fuel was a lot more expensive there vs. the mainland. Though it had a small tank (about 3 quarts or thereabouts, IIRC), it could travel a long way on the fuel it held.

The oil injection was a nice touch. My very first ride was an old Motobecane moped, and I had to premix the fuel; I had to mix the two stroke oil with the gas, and I had a special gas can for this purpose. So, when I had the Express SR, it was nice to just refill the oil tank once every week or so, and then forget about it. The scooter had a sight gauge on the side, so you could tell when you were getting low on oil and needed to refill the tank.

The Honda Express SR was a tough little bike. I even rode it around Kaena Point! Back when I was in HI, the road through Kaena Point was rough and barely passable; those who did so usually had a four wheel drive vehicle. Taking my little Honda around the point was a happy memory I'll treasure as long as I live.

The only gripe I had with the bike was I wish it had been faster and quicker. In the city of Honolulu, it was ok, but once you got out on the road, things could get dicey. After all, the top speed was 33mph or so. The lack of performance became abundantly apparent after I transferred to San Diego. Even though I stayed off the busy streets, it was still a challenge to get around; there are some serious hills in and around San Diego, and the bike slowed down when I hit 'em. Also, the arterial streets carried a lot of fairly high speed traffic. That's to be expected on any 50cc machine though, so I can't fault the Express SR for that. IN HI, it was fine though.

As pointed out in the article, the Express SR didn't have any under seat storage. That didn't bother me at the time, because few, if any, bikes or scooters did in those days; since we didn't have it, we didn't miss it. The Express SR came with a white basket on the front, and a rack on the back. If one were creative with bungee cords, one could carry a fair amount on the bike's rear rack. I used to carry all my snorkelling gear to Hanauma Bay on it.

The bike had a little, mechanical fuel gauge atop the tank; it was near the fuel tank cap. It had a needle that pointed to how much fuel you had. To view it though, you'd have to stop, dismount, and flip up the seat. Since my previous rides (the aforementioned Motobecane and a Honda Express II) didn't have ANY fuel gauges at all, I was happy to have one-even if I had to flip up the seat to look at the damn thing! After a few trips, you figured out how many miles you could travel on a tank before having to look for a gas station, so I refuelled as needed. Also, before returning to base, I would refuel my Express SR; that way, it would be ready to go the next time I used it.

As for handling and maneuverability, it was great! Zipping around Waikiki was no problem. The brakes were okay; I don't recall any time they scared me with lack of stopping power. Though they were drum brakes, they were more than adequate for the machine.

The brakes were on the handlebars, and they were configured like those on a bicycle; the right worked the rear, while the left worked the front. Because the bike was so small, I could, and literally did, park anywhere. I just LOVED being able to park it right on the sidewalk along Waikiki Beach; I loved that!

Finally, I met my girlfriend on my Express SR. I was in Waikiki one night when I saw a girl riding an Express SR identical to mine; we both had the blue model. Anyway, we talked, went riding around, and saw Firefox that night... :)

In closing, the Express SR was a fun, economical machine; I literally used pocket change to refuel it! It made my time in HI fun and memorable. If I can find one, I'll get it. Though I'm too heavy to ride one now, it would be nice to have for the memories…”



1982 HONDA EXPRESS SR (NX50)
Milage: 0 - 1000 Miles
Likes: Unique, pretty quick, aftermarket parts
Dislikes: Little wheels + high speeds = SKETCHY!

Review:
”These are fun little putt-putts. Within the past couple years a lot of aftermarket parts have been brought to the US market. There are about 10 different big bore kits to choose from and there are intakes made for bigger carbs you can get. There aren't any pipes specifically for the Express SR but certain Express/Camino/Hobbit/PA50 pipes will work with varying degrees of difficulty. You can get up around 50mph no problem. Just don't hit any pot holes at speed because those wheels are TINY!”


1982 HONDA EXPRESS SR
Milage: 1000 - 5000 Miles
Likes: No shifting, looks, seating, easy to carry in minivan
Dislikes: None

Review:
”I bought this scooter new in Hawaii in 1982 and still have the scooter. I really enjoy riding this and because of the seat configuration, I can ride easily even though I am 6 foot. I find it quite peppy and a blast to ride down to the beach, when I lived in Hawaii until 2005. I now live in a golf course community in Raleigh, North Carolina and still enjoy riding around the neighborhood. I would not feel comfortable on a highway but find riding around the neighborhood very enjoyable. It easily fits in my Minivan to take when I go on a trip that I might want to use it.”

SUBMIT REVIEW

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