asian scooters(not japanese)

Everything to do with the increasingly popular and nice scooters coming out of Taiwan.
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lshakespeare
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by lshakespeare »

Used Honda: Awesome!
Sym: Great!
Kymco: Some models are great, others good.
TNG, Tank, any Taiwan or Chinese type: stay far away from these!
Linda

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2007 Helix
2005 Kymco Bet & Win 250cc
1978 Vespa Super Grande Moped
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by donny »

you recommend SYM, another member was asking about them for reliability. they are new up here and little known, just starting to see them for sale.
presently enjoy riding a Ruckus and a Super 9. Tinkering with a Riva 180 and a couple of old Puch SV's. In the off season I enjoy a 1999 Polaris Indy 600 XLT Touring and a 2014 Artic Cat Prowler side by side
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by kz1000st »

donny wrote:you recommend SYM, another member was asking about them for reliability. they are new up here and little known, just starting to see them for sale.
Everyone who has a SYM on Scootdawg loves them. The RV 250 has proven to be as good as a Honda Reflex but at a $1000 less. The Citicom 300 is probably superior but no one is making comparisons. But this myth that all Chinese scooters are bad is really dumb. A CF Moto E-Charm or Glory has all the Specs of a Honda SH 150i at half the price and is just as reliable. I won't go into what I think about a certain Italian 150 in comparison with its air cooled motor for $4000 or more.
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by borg »

just picked up 2 brand new scoots
one is the adventure 150cc
the other is the prodigy 150cc
both have gy6 motors
was riding the adventure around town it rides like a Cadillac compare to my aero 125
i plan on selling one or both i've hooked up with a importer so i get them cheap
i went over all the bolts on the body and axles some were lose
engines are bullet prof tho if you brake them in correctly
i haven't gone over 35mph tomorrow im gonna change the oil in them with synthetic 10-40
i think i'll keep one cause i can find more parts for these then my honda
wide range of high performance parts.
the cdi in these scoots are speed restricted from factory but you can change them to unleash the power. maybe i'll post some pics.
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by kz1000st »

Just for laughs I bought a 2008 Lance Charming 50cc, cheap. It's two tone blue and white and it wasn't running. Ultimately it seems the CDI plug was loose or had some corrosion. It's running but leaking a little gas from somewhere on the carb. I just stuck new fuel line on it with no clamps so I wonder if it's dribbling out there even though it seems tight.
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by Fester »

I work for a shop that sells Chinese bikes.

These are the problems I encounter most often and some suggestions for avoiding the problems.

1.

Electrical issues.

Shockingly more often caused by bad connections than by failed electrical components.

If you are competent at soldering and don't mind spending a few nights making your bike more reliable, modify the harness to actually fit your bike. The harnesses on these bikes are pretty much universal. So there are a lot of extra wires and a lot of extra length on wires.

And the connectors are really cheap.

And the harnesses are mostly just supported by a few zip ties here and there.

So over time all that extra weight vibrates and shakes around and pulls on the cheap connectors and wires come loose or the connectors lose their grip and intermittent problems arise.

What I do is cut the connectors out of the junctions between the main harness (inside the leg guard, behind the headlight) and solder the junctions. Most often the problems arise in that wad of connectors than lives inside that rubber boot inside the leg guard. I get rid of that whole thing and hardwire it.

I also frequently cut inches to feet of useless length out of the harness when I do this job. Then I hang the cleaned up harness on the bike with as many zip ties as I can find a place to tie them. The more you support the harness the better.

Vibrations turn good connectors bad. They need your help and support to stay strong.


2.
Leaky hoses.

The hoses that come on the bike are cheap. The wire clamps are useless. I replace all the fuel and vacuum line with Goodyear hose and put good spring clamps on the fuel lines.

Vacuum leaks cause drivability issues that can be hard to track down. Stop them before they start and you'll thank yourself.

For about $10 you can replace that whole mess of vacuum and fuel hoses and never have to worry.


3.
Carb issues.

If your Chinese bike won't run after sitting for a while, 9 times out of 10 it's a clogged pilot jet.

The wires to the electric choke have all the same problems as the rest of the harness. Act accordingly.

Other than that, the carbs seem pretty durable and reliable.


4.
Broken Kickstarters.

Just don't kickstart a Chinese. OK, if you are being chased my a crazy axe murderer and you get to your scooter to find your battery has is dead, go ahead and give it a kick.

But don't get lazy or cheap on the first start of the season and figure you'll just kick it up once and let the it idle to recharge the battery.

The kickstarter should be thought of more like an ejection seat. It's there for if it's a life or death situation, but you'd never eject just to save yourself the hassle of landing a plane.

The kickstarters have plastic bushings that break easily. Sometimes after just a couple of good kicks.

And sometimes when that bushing breaks, it jams the kickstart gear in it's up position (lever will stick down, but the internal gear is up) and then when you use the electric starter it will hit the kickstart gear. And then things get really ugly. At best just some broken starter bolts, at worst a broken case.


5.

Never lay a Chinese down on it's right side.'

The muffler bracket is stronger than the part of the engine case it bolts to. And the weight of the bike on the muffler will break the case. If you have to lay it down (why would you? but people do!) lay it on the left side.

6.
No oil filter.

Keep up on your oil changes. Whatever the manufacturer suggests for an oil change interval, consider that the absolute max.

It's less than one quart. It takes 10 minutes to do. If you can do an oil change every 300 miles, your Chinese might make it 10,000 miles. If you neglect an oil change for 1000 miles, it might be 1/2 of the life span of the engine.

I have seen 2000 mile Chinese bikes with worn rings and 80psi compression that are just dead - more expensive to fix than to buy a new one. Probably never had an oil change.

I have seen 10,000 mile Chinese bikes with great compression that run like a top.

And it's all about the maintenance. If you can change your oil every week, it won't hurt anything (other than the environment) and your engine will be happy happy.


If you can get a handle those 6 things, you can actually have a reliable Chinese bike.

And a hobby of maintaining it.
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by Dan Durston »

Informative post....thanks. That bit about the kickstarter/ejection seat was pretty funny.
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by donny »

DandyDan wrote:Informative post....thanks. That bit about the kickstarter/ejection seat was pretty funny.
yeah he gets the point across about the kick starter :lol:

and those 6 things is a lot of work
interesting about wiring, i thought they would not waste a cm.
presently enjoy riding a Ruckus and a Super 9. Tinkering with a Riva 180 and a couple of old Puch SV's. In the off season I enjoy a 1999 Polaris Indy 600 XLT Touring and a 2014 Artic Cat Prowler side by side
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by Jarlaxle »

Probably cheaper to just buy a "generic" harness than to spec one out for each model. Even many car harnesses have plenty of unused wires.

Having said that: my friend had a Chinese scoot...an "Islander 50". (As near as he could tell, it was a Yamaha-clone, I've been told it's a Roketa.) It looked awful...a beat-up (looked like multiple drops) former rental (well, that explains the drops), but ran like a top with about 5500 miles when sold. He changed oil every 1000 miles with Castrol or M1 synthetic, which I'm sure helped. Paid $150, replaced the battery, spark plug, broken right mirror, & headlight bulbs, fixed the throttle cable, got a helmet, and put 2000+ miles on it...sold it a year later for $250. (I recall his fixes cost a bit more than $100, mostly for the battery & the oddball headlights.) It had its quirks (notably, the fuel gauge never worked from the day he got it, and the kick-starter was busted), but got 100+MPG and was absolutely stone reliable. Only exception was that if it was cool and damp, starting it was a bear. Cool and dry or warm & wet or even warm & raining, it was fine & would fire right up. It even fired right up after the engine was hosed off (cold) on a warm day...but cool and damp, not so much.
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by donny »

Yup, it is not pretty but it is cheap and runs. Good to here clone stories that are not all nightmares :) Being a former rental(no run- no $) it probably seen a lot of shop time when new and bugs worked out, other than the kick starter,which was better to leave broken :lol: Again maintenance is a big issue,as with all scooters.But it is pretty easy and doing it your self saves $.And if any problems fixing we are here to help :geek:
presently enjoy riding a Ruckus and a Super 9. Tinkering with a Riva 180 and a couple of old Puch SV's. In the off season I enjoy a 1999 Polaris Indy 600 XLT Touring and a 2014 Artic Cat Prowler side by side
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by Jarlaxle »

Yeah, the rental outfit cared for it pretty well and he got service records: synthetic 10W-40 every 1000 miles, gearbox oil & a plug every second oil change, new CVT belt at 2500 miles.
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Re: asian scooters(not japanese)

Post by tiny »

I own a CF Moto e-Charm or CMI FreePass in Canada and the only real problems I've had so far is trying to find any parts that I need like the rear tyre. Neither CF Moto or CMI will sell me parts directly and the only CMI dealer wont deal with my scooter because they only deal with the ATVs.

But other then that great power, speed (topped 120Km/hr) and okay fuel economy.
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